Nov 242013
 
Faust's dream vision
Your parents are intelligent, well educated people. You don’t understand why they believe in what their religion teaches. Are they hypocrites? What makes them to believe?

This article will help you to feel more relieved when you understand what makes billions of people to believe in myths and follow religions. You are not alone in your search for the answers. Use the share and bookmarking buttons to help others to find this article.

    “Because this theory can be tested scientifically, we can  learn its strengths and weaknesses, and gradually improve it,” Reiss said. “Eventually, we may understand better the psychological basis of religion.”

 

16 basic desires :

Power, independence, curiosity, acceptance, order, saving, honor, idealism, social contact, family, status, vengeance, romance, eating, physical exercise, and tranquility.

 

People are not drawn to religion just because of a fear of death or any other single reason, according to a new comprehensive, psychological theory of religion.

There are actually 16 basic human psychological needs that motivate people to seek meaning through religion, said Steven Reiss, author of the new theory and professor of psychology and psychiatry at Ohio State University.

These basic human needs – which include honor, idealism, curiosity and acceptance – can explain why certain people are attracted to religion, why God images express psychologically opposite qualities, and the relationship between personality and religious experiences.

Previous psychologists tried to explain religion in terms of just one or two overarching psychological needs. The most common reason they cite is that people embrace religion because of a fear of death, as expressed in the saying ‘there are no atheists in foxholes,” Reiss said.

Luis Ricardo Falero, Public Domain

Luis Ricardo Falero, Public Domain

“But religion is multi-faceted – it can’t be reduced to just one or two desires.”

Reiss described his new theory – which he said may be the most comprehensive psychological theory of religion since Freud’s work more than a century ago — in the June issue of Zygon, a journal devoted to issues of science and religion.

“I don’t think there has been a comprehensive theory of religion that was scientifically testable,” he said.

The theory is based on his overall theory of human motivation, which he calls sensitivity theory. Sensitivity theory is explained in his 2000 book Who Am I? The 16 Basic Desires that Motivate Our Action and Define Our Personalities(Tarcher Putnam).

 

Reiss said that each of the 16 basic desires outlined in the book influence the psychological appeal of religious behavior. The desires are power, independence, curiosity, acceptance, order, saving, honor, idealism, social contact, family, status, vengeance, romance, eating, physical exercise, and tranquility.

In fact, Reiss has already done some initial research that suggests the desire for independence is a key psychological desire that separates religious and non-religious people. In a study published in 2000, Reiss found that religious people (the study included mostly Christians) expressed a strong desire for interdependence with others. Those who were not religious, however, showed a stronger need to be self-reliant and independent.

The study also showed that religious people valued honor more than non-religious people, which Reiss said suggests many people embrace religion to show loyalty to parents and ancestors.

In the Zygon paper, Reiss explains that every religious person balances their 16 basic human needs to fit their own personality.

“They embrace those aspects of religious imagery that express their strongest psychological needs and deepest personal values.”

One example is the desire for curiosity, Reiss said. Religious intellectuals, who are high in curiosity, value a God who is knowable through reason, while doers, who have weak curiosity, may value a God that is knowable only through revelation.

“People who have a strong need for order should enjoy ritualized religious experiences, whereas those with a weak need for order may prefer more spontaneous expression of faith,” he said.

“The prophecy that the weak will inherit the earth should appeal especially to people with a weak need for status, whereas the teaching that everybody is equal before God should appeal especially to people with a strong need for idealism.”

If religion and personality are linked, religion must provide a range of images and symbols sufficiently diverse to appeal to all the different kinds of personalities in the human population, Reiss says. Religious imagery potentially accommodates everybody because in many instances the images and symbols are psychological opposites.

“How we value and balance the 16 psychological needs is what makes us an individual, and for every individual there are appealing religious images,” he said.

“The values that guide a personality with a strong need for vindication are expressed by a God of wrath, or a war God, while the values that guide a personality with a weak need for vindication are expressed by a God of forgiveness.”

“The values that guide a personality with a strong need to socialize are expressed by religious fellowship and festivals, while the values that guide a personality with a weak need to socialize are expressed by religious asceticism.”

The need for acceptance makes meaningful images of God as a savior, while its opposite inspires the concept of original sin, according to Reiss. The need to eat motives some people to value abstinence and others to value sustenance.

“Because this theory can be tested scientifically, we can learn its strengths and weaknesses, and gradually improve it,” Reiss said. “Eventually, we may understand better the psychological basis of religion.”

Reiss emphasized that the theory addresses the psychology of religious experiences and has no implications for the validity or invalidity of religious beliefs.

You may get a clearer picture and peace of mind after you read other books from this author. There are links provided on the web page to buy the books from Amazon.

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike license.Creative Commons License

NEW THEORY SUGGESTS PEOPLE ARE ATTRACTED TO RELIGION FOR 16 REASONS by Jeff Grabmeier is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/religdes.htm.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://beyondpenguins.ehe.osu.edu/terms-of-use.
Oct 282013
 
Nikola Tesla man out of time

“My brain is only a receiver. In the Universe there is a core from which we obtain knowledge, strength, inspiration.

NikolaTesla-man-out-of-time

I have not penetrated into the secrets of this core, but I know it exists.”
-Nikola Tesla




Nikola Tesla was spiritual and positive.

Another quote from famous inventor Nikola Tesla is There is no conflict between the ideal of religion and the ideal of science, but science is opposed to theological dogmas because science is founded on fact. To me, the universe is simply a great machine which never came into being and never will end. The human being is no exception to the natural order. Man, like the universe, is a machine. Nothing enters our minds or determines our actions which is not directly or indirectly a response to stimuli beating upon our sense organs from without.  Owing to the similarity of our construction and the sameness of our environment, we respond in like manner to similar stimuli, and from the concordance of our reactions, understanding is born. In the course of ages, mechanisms of infinite complexity are developed, but what we call “soul” or “spirit,” is nothing more than the sum of the functioning of the body. When this functioning ceases, the “soul” or the “spirit” ceases likewise.

    While I don’t agree  fully with the last quote, importance of citing Nikola Tesla’s words about intangible energy or source of power is in the similarities with the knowledge that author of this website received from god.

I recommend reading more about life of Nikola Tesla to my readers and hopefully followers.
In “Tesla: Man Out of Time” book, Margaret Cheney explores the brilliant and prescient mind of one of the twentieth century’s greatest scientists and inventors. Called a madman by his enemies, a genius by others, and an enigma by nearly everyone, Nikola Tesla was, without a doubt, a trailblazing inventor who created astonishing, sometimes world-transforming devices that were virtually without theoretical precedent. Tesla not only discovered the rotating magnetic field — the basis of most alternating-current machinery — but also introduced us to the fundamentals of robotics, computers, and missile science. Almost supernaturally gifted, unfailingly flamboyant and neurotic, Tesla was troubled by an array of compulsions and phobias and was fond of extravagant, visionary experimentations. He was also a popular man-about-town, admired by men as diverse as Mark Twain and George Westinghouse, and adored by scores of society beauties.
From Tesla’s childhood in Yugoslavia to his death in New York in the 1940s, Cheney paints a compelling human portrait and chronicles a lifetime of discoveries that radically altered — and continue to alter — the world in which we live. Tesla: Man Out of Time is an in-depth look at the seminal accomplishments of a scientific wizard and a thoughtful examination of the obsessions and eccentricities of the man behind the science.

Tesla: Man Out of Time

         Nikola Tesla (Serbian Cyrillic: Никола Тесла; 10 July 1856 — 7 January 1943) was a Serbian-American inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer, electrical engineer, and futurist. He was an important contributor to the use of commercial electricity, and is best known for developing the modern alternating current (AC) electrical supply system. His many revolutionary developments in the field of electromagnetism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries were based on the theories of electromagnetic technology discovered by Michael Faraday. Tesla’s patents and theoretical work also formed the basis of wireless communication and the radio.
Electromechanical devices and principles developed by Nikola Tesla:
Various devices that use rotating magnetic fields (1882)
The Induction motor, rotary transformers, and “high” frequency alternators
The Tesla coil,[54] his magnifying transmitter, and other means for increasing the intensity of electrical oscillations (including condenser discharge transformations and the Tesla oscillators[55][56])
Alternating current long-distance electrical transmission system[57] (1888) and other methods and devices for power transmission
Systems for wireless communication (prior art for the invention of radio) and radio frequency oscillators[58]
Robotics and the electronic logic gate[59]

Electrotherapy Tesla currents[60][61][62]
Wireless transfer of electricity and the Tesla effect[63][64]
Tesla impedance phenomena[65]
Tesla electro-static field, Tesla principle, Bifilar coil, Telegeodynamics
Tesla insulation, Tesla impulses[66], Tesla frequencies[54],
Tesla discharge[54], Tesla turbines (e.g., bladeless turbines) for water, steam and gas and the Tesla pumps, Tesla igniter,
Corona discharge ozone generator, Tesla compressor,
X-rays Tubes using the Bremsstrahlung process, Devices for ionized gases and “Hot Saint Elmo’s Fire”.[67], Devices for high field emission,
Devices for charged particle beams, Phantom streaming devices[68]
Arc light systems, Methods for providing extremely low level of resistance to the passage of electric current (predecessor to superconductivity),
Voltage multiplication circuitry, Devices for high voltage discharges
Devices for lightning protection, VTOL aircraft, Dynamic theory of gravity, Concepts for electric vehicles, Polyphase systems.

By Shaheen Hajigil
Google
Original Photograph is in public domain.  PD-US- public domain

Sep 162013
 

 

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